Category Archives: Indian

Goan Egg Curry

I’m a member of a Goan food group and the admin set us a challenge to make this traditional egg curry. It looked really tempting in the photo, and I’m always a sucker for some Goan food. I tried his ‘egg drop’ variation, which gave an added silky texture to the gravy, in addition to the coconut milk. I did make a few changes, mainly in the amount of chillies I used (the dried ones I have are really deadly, so have to tone them down a bit) and I used less tamarind as well.

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Kerala Garam Masala

‘Garam masala’ is such a generic term, and it is ubiquitous in Indian cooking. But every region (and every family, even) has a subtly different version. This particular version is typical in Kerala, and I was given this recipe by my friend and super foodie Rhea, who in turn got it from a friend. The biggest difference to the Punjabi garam masala that I have been used to while growing up is the absence of the standard punjabi aromats cumin, coriander and bay leaves, and the presence of fennel instead.

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Malabar Venison Curry

I spent many years as a child eating Keralan food at a friend’s house. Then many years later, I spent two years in Kozhikode and I just loved the local food there. The biryanis, the fish, even the shawarmas (with the ‘gelf‘ influence prominent) were amazing. So when I came across this little treasure called the Malabar Muslim Cookery book, I simbly had to pick it up. This recipe is based on one of the three mutton curry recipes in the book. Each is subtly different from the others, either in the method of preparation or ingredients. And, of course, I’ve made this with venison, but it would be great with some mutton or goat pieces (with the bone in).

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Saoji Chicken

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This recipe, from the Nagpur region of Maharashtra, has been adapted from the Saoji Mutton recipe in Aditya Mehendale’s book ‘Rare Gems’. This recipe works equally well with mutton (lamb), chicken, prawns and even paneer for the vegetarians among us.

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Kheema Pav

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One of my favourite dishes is Kheema Pav, which is mince served with the ubiquitous Mumbai bread rolls. There are many versions of this dish, mainly variations in the way the meat is cooked. As an apprentice Marine Engineer I used to spend a lot of time in and around the Mumbai docks, where there is an abundance of the small Muslim cafés and restaurants. These restaurants specialise in a multitude of meat dishes cooked in a particular style, that are not easily available elsewhere. And so, the Kheema Pav served there has a particular nostalgic attraction in my mind. After many years of trying to recreate the taste at home, I came across a recipe that triggered ‘that taste‘ in my mind (thanks to Farrukh Aziz). And now, finally,  I’m able to make my version of this wonderful dish, tweaked to be healthier, with the use of alternate meats (like chicken or turkey) and much less oil than they use in the restaurants, but still with the key flavours that remind me of those idyllic days.

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Sabudana Khichdi (Tapioca pearls with peanuts and potatoes)

Sabudana (Sago) Khichdi

Sabudana Khichdi (literally meaning a ‘mishmash’) is a very popular breakfast dish, especially in Maharashtra. Growing up in Mumbai, one sees and consumes this everywhere and even now this is a firm favourite in our household, especially on weekends when one has the opportunity for a more leisurely breakfast.

Sabudana or Tapioca pearls are a processed form of the Tapioca root, and are a common ingredient in Indian kitchens. Sabudana is an accepted food during most religious fasts (vrat) and so it is used extensively on such days to make a variety of foods from breakfast dishes, fried snacks and even desserts.

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Akuri – Spiced Scrambled Eggs, Parsi style


My friends Rhea and Kurush have never missed an opportunity to extol the Parsi love of eggs or ‘eedu’ on and with everything. And one of their classic egg dishes is the Akuri, a delightful Parsi version of scrambled eggs, cooked in an onion-tomato masala and spices. Ever since Rhea posted a recipe for Akuri, it’s been lingering at the back of my mind. And so the other day, when I was craving eggs, but still something slightly different, I thought to dig up the recipe and give it a go. To my pleasant surprise, it’s not so different from the Punjabi version we usualy make at home… just subtle differences that you think will affect the dish subtly, but still makes for a fairly distinct dish in the end. I think the biggest difference was the use of ginger, garlic and turmeric.

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